How to Upgrade Your Boat Lift and Dock?

yatch boat lift img
How to Upgrade Your Boat Lift and Dock?

Have you bought your dream new boat and are wondering if it will work with your existing boat lift and dock?  Our partner, SteMic Marine Construction, has a client that bought a beautiful new Valhalla Boatworks V-46 center console.  Unfortunately, they knew that their existing boat lift did not have the capacity to accommodate the Valhalla.  They wanted the perfect boat lift to elevate their boating experience and chose our 40,000 pound Hi-Speed Alumavator boat lift.

The customer needs to have their slip cut-out modified and their new boat lift customized to fit the larger Valhalla.  We would like to show you the engineering and design processes IMM Quality Boat Lifts and Stemic Marine Construction use to make sure that our boat lifts work perfectly with your boat and the dock at your home.  This post will highlight the collaboration between marine contractor and manufacturer that is critical to obtaining the best results.

The Challenge:

The client’s new Valhalla V-46 boat is too big for their existing boat lift.

The Solution:

IMM Quality Boat Lifts engineers collaborate with SteMic Marine Construction to design and install a new 40,000-pound Hi-Speed Alumavator lift.

Key Steps in the Collaboration:

  • Obtaining the Valhalla’s hull drawing to determine pile spacing and bunk support design.
  • Analyzing the existing dock layout to recommend optimal pile placement.
  • Designing a custom keel beam with stepped support pads to accommodate the Valhalla’s unique hull shape and protect its transducer.

The Takeaway:

  • Upgrading a boat lift and dock system requires careful planning and collaboration between a qualified manufacturer and a marine contractor.
  • IMM Quality Boat Lifts offers high-capacity lifts and works with partner contractors like SteMic Marine Construction to ensure a perfect fit and functionality.
 
40,000 pound Hi-Speed Alumavator boat lift

The first step was to obtain the hull drawing from Valhalla, so that our engineers could see the hull dimensions, center of gravity and hull features of the V-46 to best lay out the pile spacing within the slip and to design a bunk support system.

Hull drawing of the Valhalla V-46 showing center of gravity and hull features

Figure 1.  Hull drawing of the Valhalla V-46 showing center of gravity and hull features.

Stemic sent a layout of the existing dock and asked us to determine if 7 foot or 10 foot spacing would work best.  

Layout of the existing dock

Figure 2.  Layout of the existing dock.

Our engineers examined the dock layout and the hull drawing, determined that 7 foot spacing would work best.  We sent Stemic a figure showing the ideal pile layout to assist with their piling installation.

Pile layout drawing showing the boat center of gravity, centered on the lift.

Figure 3. Pile layout drawing showing the boat center of gravity, centered on the lift.

With our extensive experience, our engineers knew that the best way to lift a large boat like the Valhalla is with a keel beam and stanchion pad supports.  

the best way to lift a large boat like the Valhalla is with a keel beam and stanchion pad supports

However, the Valhalla V-46 has a stepped hull and a long transducer on the keel.  These features require additional design work from our engineers.  They designed a custom keel beam with stepped support pads to match the stepped hull.  

Design of the Stepped Keel Beam Support

Figure 4.  Design of the Stepped Keel Beam Support

Our engineers purposefully designed the keel Beam support such that the hull only makes contact in the front and rear, leaving a middle section open.  This open space aligns with the large transducer and was designed to protect the transducer from being crushed.

Our engineers purposefully designed the keel Beam support such that the hull only makes contact in the front and rear, leaving a middle section open

With the planning complete, all that remained was for SteMic Marine Construction to install the boat lift.  One can easily see Stemic’s attention to detail and excellent craftsmanship in all of these images.

SteMic Marine Construction boat lift installation complete

So, when you decide that it is time to upgrade your boat and you want to do it right, give our sales team a call at 1-800-545-5603 and they will be able to put you in contact with one of our marine contractor partners.

Happy boating!

The Ultimate Guide to Boat Lift Maintenance

When washing down your boat after a day on the water, don't forget to also wash the salt and sea spray from your boat lift top beams and cradles.

The Dock and Boat Lift Inspection

The Pile and Seawall Inspection

Start by examining your pilings, dock structure, and/or seawall. Your boat lift is only as strong as the foundation that supports it. If your pilings or dock structure show signs of damage, you should repair them before the weight of your boat and lift cause a catastrophic failure.

damaged pile and seawall
Figure 1: Damaged pile and seawall

Top Beams Inspection

Next, examine the structure of your top beams. If your boat lifts top beams were made from galvanized steel, you should carefully look for rust. Unfortunately, the galvanized coating comes off easily and the steel will begin to rust. Galvanized steel can rust completely through the metal compromising the structural integrity of your boat lift. At the first signs of rust, you should clean it off and apply a protective coating to the steel.

Unlike steel, aluminum only surface oxidizes. The surface layer of aluminum oxide forms a protective coating preventing further oxidation of internal aluminum molecules, which allows aluminum beams to maintain their structural strength. Because aluminum does not rust through and only surface oxidizes, most modern boat lifts use aluminum for their structural beams. Although you may not like the patina look of oxidized aluminum, you can rest assured that your aluminum beams are structurally sound and protected from internal rusting.

The aluminum pipe was dipped into an oxidizing agent to demonstrate the difference between "clean" and oxidized aluminum.
Figure 2. The aluminum pipe was dipped into an oxidizing agent to demonstrate the difference between “clean” and oxidized aluminum.

Next, you need to examine your lift’s top beam structure for galvanic corrosion.

It is fairly common to see signs of galvanic corrosion where stainless steel hardware touches the aluminum top beams. The amount of corrosion shown in image 3 is primarily cosmetic and not much to be concerned about. However, image 4 shows a case where the corrosion has damaged the aluminum winder nearly to the point of failure.

signs of galvanic corrosion
Image 3 is primarily cosmetic and not much to be concerned about. Image 4 shows a case where the corrosion has damaged the aluminum winder nearly to the point of failure.

In both cases, occasionally rinsing the boat lift with fresh water will help minimize galvanic corrosion.

Oxidative corrosion and galvanic corrosion look very similar, but the mechanism for galvanic corrosion is very different. A simple explanation is that salt has electrolytes that dissolve in water. These electrolytes are attracted to any electrons that are found nearby. Every type of metal has electrons. Yet some metal is more chemically active and has a greater negative electromechanical potential than others. Metals like platinum, titanium, stainless steel, and silver are less chemically active and therefore act as cathodes (positive). Metals which are more chemically active function as anodes (negative). These metals include zinc, magnesium, and aluminum alloys.

When two dissimilar metals enter an electrolyte solution, in this case saltwater, the electrolytes connect to each metal, and create a current flow from the anode-type metal to the cathode-type metal. This electrochemical process is much like a battery where you have a positive side and a negative side with the saltwater creating a conducive path for the current. The electrolytes pull out the electrons from the anode metal while flowing toward the cathode metal, as the anode metal begins to corrode away. This process is called galvanic corrosion. To make matters worse, there is another similar type of corrosion, electrolytic corrosion. With electrolytic corrosion, an electric current has been introduced into the electrolyte solution. When an electric current is added into saltwater, it speeds up the rate of corrosion because the electric current quickly flows from the anode metal to the cathode metal speeding up the rate at which the anode metal’s electrons are removed. The electrical source can be as simple as faulty wiring (from a boat battery, dock light, boat lift, etc.) discharging its electric current into the water.

Powerheads Inspection

One of the most important things to inspect are your powerheads. Make sure that your gearbox and motors have not been damaged in a collision, or by the environment.

Rusty Boat Lift Motor and Uncovered Gearing

One of the best ways to protect your powerheads is to keep them under a cover (See the post “Benefits of a Covered Drive” to learn how our covers protect your powerheads from more than just the elements.). That is why IMM Quality Boat Lifts covers all our powerheads.

The Alumavator, Platinum and Superlift covers

Rusty Cradle beams and brackets and Worn carpet on bunks

Cradles and Bunks Inspection

Moving down the boat lift structure, carefully inspect the boat lift cradles and bunks. Look for signs of corrosion on the support beams as well as the brackets that support guide posts or bunks. If you have carpeted wood bunks, examine the carpet for signs of wear.

Lift Cables Inspection

Lastly, inspect your lift’s cables. Ultimately, the cables support the entire weight of your boat. Carefully inspect the cables for signs of damage and wear. We recommend replacing your cables every two years or 200 up and down “cycles”, whichever comes first.

Immediately replace the cables if you notice any of these types of cable damage.
Image 10: Immediately replace the cables if you notice any of these types of cable damage.

One of the best ways to protect your cables and extend their usable life is to own a boat lift that uses grooved aluminum cable winders. Aluminum is softer than the steel of the cables, which will help minimize metal-on-metal abrasion to the cables. The grooved winders also neatly wind the cable, preventing cable on cable wraps and helping to prevent the types of damage shown in Image 10.

Grooved aluminum winder with cable pre-wrapped at factory for simple installation.
Image 11: Grooved aluminum winder with cable pre-wrapped at factory for simple installation.

If you determine that the lift’s cables need to be replaced, please visit this post “Installing a new boat lift cable” for helpful advice on the process.

Special Considerations for Elevator Lifts

Elevator lifts have additional maintenance concerns. They have permanently installed tracks in the water that the carriage rides on. Because these tracks are always in the seawater, they are especially susceptible to corrosion.

New elevator lift showing how tracks are permanently installed underwater
Image 12: New elevator lift showing how tracks are permanently installed underwater

To minimize your risk of corrosion, we recommend installing sacrificial Zinc anodes to the elevator tracks. Zinc is chemically more active than aluminum, therefore the zinc anode will corrode away before galvanic corrosion begins attacking the aluminum tracks. Frequently check, and replace worn zinc anodes to minimize the effects of galvanic corrosion on the tracks.

minimize your risk of corrosion

Failure to maintain the sacrificial zinc anodes may result in significant galvanic corrosion. The following image shows an elevator track, carriage arm and support brackets that suffered severe galvanic corrosion that could have been minimized by maintaining the sacrificial zinc anodes.

galvanic corrosion

Lubricate Lubricate Lubricate!

To keep your boat lift working properly, you must make sure that all the moving parts are properly lubricated. Lubricate the powerheads. Consult your owner’s manual to determine what parts of your boat lift’s powerhead require lubrication. Our Alumavator and Superlift powerheads have sprockets and chains that require lubrication every six months.

The Alumavator and Superlift sprockets and chain require lubrication.
Image 15: The Alumavator and Superlift sprockets and chain require lubrication.

If you are willing to take the cover off, we recommend wiping on a thin layer of marine grade grease over the entire sprocket and chain. However, we have made an easier solution that does not require the removal of the cover. On the back side of the powerhead plate, we have made an access port to lubricate the chain and sprocket. While running the lift down, take the red plug out of the hole and apply chain and cable spray lubricant onto the chain.

 It's easy to use spray chain lube with our access port.
Image 16. It’s easy to use spray chain lube with our access port.

Our Platinum lifts were designed to be low maintenance. The Platinum powerheads use a double reduction direct drive gearbox. The gearboxes were filled with lubricant and sealed at the factory. Therefore, no lubrication is necessary during routine maintenance.

The no-maintenance Platinum powerheads do not require lubrication.
Image 17: The no-maintenance Platinum powerheads do not require lubrication.

Lubricate the drive pipe bearings

One of the most important, and time-consuming, components of a boat lift to lubricate are the drive pipe bearings. Typically, these bearings have zerk grease fittings for a grease gun to lubricate the bearing. Most boat lifts have 4-5 drive pipe bearings per top beam that require lubrication, but you also need to check your powerheads because they sometimes have zerk fittings for lubrication.

Drive pipe bearings with zerk grease fittings. Notice how the "flat plate drive" powerhead contains a drive pipe bearing block that requires lubrication using a zerk grease fitting.
Image 18. Drive pipe bearings with zerk grease fittings. Notice how the “flat plate drive” powerhead contains a drive pipe bearing block that requires lubrication using a zerk grease fitting.

Zerk Grease Fittings

To fill the bearings with grease, attach the grease gun hose to the zerk fitting and pump in grease until you see some squeeze out between the drive shaft and bearing. Repeat this process for each drive pipe bearing.
drive pipe bearings2
drive pipe bearings

In order to ensure good grease distribution, you should rotate the drive pipe and pump in more grease at each bearing. You should repeat the rotation and greasing process two more times and then move on to the second top beam.

The manufacturers recommend lubricating these bearings at least once every six months. Rain can wash away some grease, but the biggest problem is that the heat and the sun rays degrade the grease and cause it to solidify. Solidified grease is very difficult to remove and it can block the zerk fittings, making it very difficult to lubricate your lift.

This drive pipe bearing was not lubricated frequently enough. The grease hardened and the drive pipe has seized within the bearing.
Image 19. This drive pipe bearing was not lubricated frequently enough. The grease hardened and the drive pipe has seized within the bearing.

IMM Quality Boat Lifts Solution

What if you don’t like all that grease squeezing out of the bearings and dripping on to your boat, the dock and into the water? What a mess! What if you don’t feel like lubricating your drive pipe bearings every six months?

IMM Quality Boat Lifts understands completely. That is why we use self-lubricating tribopolymer bushings in all of our drive pipe bearings. This space age material was developed by NASA for the shuttle program because grease bearings make no sense in outer space. Our drive pipe bearings have no zerk fittings, no need for grease and no need for any other maintenance. By using this revolutionary material in all of our models we help save you time and money by reducing maintenance costs.

A self-lubricating Tribopolymer bushing is shown on the top beam channel. This bushing presses into the drive pipe bearing and prevents abrasion wear between the drive pipe and bearing block. This maintenance-free component is only available on IMM Quality boat lifts.
Image 20: A self-lubricating Tribopolymer bushing is shown on the top beam channel. This bushing presses into the drive pipe bearing and prevents abrasion wear between the drive pipe and bearing block. This maintenance-free component is only available on IMM Quality boat lifts.

Lubricate the Pulleys / Sheaves

Another time-consuming task is the lubrication of the boat lift’s sheaves/pulleys. Typically, the pulley bearing has a zerk grease fitting to lubricate between the shaft and pulley. The number of pulleys will depend on how many parts the cable system contains (cable drops straight down (1 part), the cable comes down goes around a pulley, and then back up (2 parts), etc.) The pulleys may be located on the cradles or the top beams. All the pulleys will require lubrication at a minimum of every six months.

lubricate the pulleys
Image 21. New slide on pulley with zerk fitting on left, seized pulley on right.

The pulley on the right in image 21 was not properly lubricated and has seized so that it no longer turns. Now when you lower or raise the lift, the cables saw into the metal of the pulley and will cause tremendous abrasion damage to the cables. If this pulley is not replaced quickly, the cables will snap.

Even if your pulleys have not seized, forgetting to lubricate them will cause abrasion wear. Image 22 shows pulley axles worn away and the damage that a lack of lubrication may cause to your pulleys.

The left image shows a new axle bolt, a worn axle bolt and an axle bolt that has cracked due to improper lubrication. The image on the right demonstrates how the axle bolt can grind through the pulley bearing when not properly lubricated.
Image 22. The left image shows a new axle bolt, a worn axle bolt and an axle bolt that has cracked due to improper lubrication. The image on the right demonstrates how the axle bolt can grind through the pulley bearing when not properly lubricated.

What if you don’t have time to lubricate your sheaves/pulleys every six months? What if you forget?

We are all busy, trust us, we get it. That is why we use self-lubricating tribopolymer bushings in all of our sheaves/pulleys. Just like our drive pipe bearings, our pulleys do not require lubrication and never need any maintenance. By using the best materials available in the pulleys in all of our models we help save you time and money by reducing maintenance costs.

self lubricating tribopolymer
Image 23. Our pulley and a self-lubricating tribopolymer bushing. The bushing presses into the pulley and protects the pulley and axle bolt from abrasion wear. These bushings do not require lubrication or any ongoing maintenance.

Conclusion

Owning a boat lift makes cleaning and maintaining your boat a much easier task, but don’t neglect to maintain your boat lift as well.

When washing down your boat after a day on the water, don't forget to also wash the salt and sea spray from your boat lift top beams and cradles.
Image 24. When washing down your boat after a day on the water, don’t forget to also wash the salt and sea spray from your boat lift top beams and cradles.

We hope you found this guide helpful and edifying. By showing you some of the things that can go wrong if you neglect to perform routine maintenance, we hope that you will make your boat lift’s maintenance a priority.

We also hope that we have convinced you that maintaining an IMM Quality boat lift is much easier than with the competition. Our lifts were engineered to make the user experience as easy and enjoyable as possible. By only using the best possible materials, we will save you time and money by reducing the amount of maintenance you need to perform on your lift. That way you will be able to get back out on the water and enjoy yourself.

If you have any questions or need any advice about your boat lift maintenance, please don’t hesitate to call us at (800) 545-5603. Also, if you need any parts for your maintenance, our sales team will make sure that you get what you need.
Happy Boating!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Ultimate Guide to Boat Lift Maintenance

It's crucial to check for signs of rust or corrosion to maintain structural integrity and ensure safety.

Inspect cables regularly for damage and wear, and replace them every two years or after 200 cycles to ensure safety.

Keeping powerheads under a cover helps protect them from environmental damage and prolongs their lifespan.

Due to their constant submersion, it's recommended to install sacrificial zinc anodes on elevator tracks to minimize corrosion.

Lubrication of sprockets, chains, drive pipe bearings, and pulleys is essential for smooth operation and should be done at least every six months.

The Benefits of Owning a Boat Lift: How Investing in a Boat Lift Can Save You Time and Money

Extend The Life Of Your Boat Lift Canopy
If you’re a boat owner, you know how important it is to keep your boat in good condition. Regular maintenance and upkeep are crucial to ensuring that your vessel is always ready for your next adventure on the water. However, maintaining a boat can be time-consuming and expensive, especially if you don’t have the right equipment. This is where a boat lift comes in. A boat lift is a device that raises your boat out of the water and keeps it secure while it’s not in use. By investing in a boat lift, you can save time and money on maintenance and repairs, extend the life of your boat, and even increase the value of your waterfront property. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the benefits of owning a boat lift and how it can help you make the most of your time on the water. Whether you’re a seasoned boat owner or just getting started, a boat lift is a valuable investment that can pay off in more ways than one.

Boat Lift Saves Time

Owning a boat lift can save you a significant amount of time in several ways:
  • No More Trailering

    Trailering your boat to and from the water can be a time-consuming process. With a boat lift, you can keep your boat in the water all season long, eliminating the need for trailering. This means you can spend more time enjoying your boat and less time preparing it for the water.
  • Easy Access

    Launching and retrieving your boat can be a hassle without a boat lift, especially if you have to wade into the water to get to your boat. A boat lift allows you to easily access your boat without getting wet or dirty, saving you time and hassle.
  • Less Maintenance

    Keeping your boat in the water can lead to algae and barnacle growth, which can increase maintenance time and costs. With a boat lift, you can keep your boat out of the water when you’re not using it, reducing the need for maintenance and cleaning.
  • Quick and Easy Repairs

    If your boat needs repairs or maintenance, a boat lift makes it quick and easy to access the hull and underside of your boat. This can save you time and money by allowing you to make repairs yourself or get them done quickly by a professional.
Overall, owning a boat lift can save you time by eliminating the need for trailering, providing easy access to your boat, reducing maintenance time, and facilitating quick repairs. By investing in a boat lift, you can spend more time enjoying your boat and less time on maintenance and upkeep.

Boat Lifts Can Extend Boat Life

Boat Lift Build For A Yacht That Will Last A Life Time
Boat Lift Build For A Yacht That Will Last A Life Time
Owning a boat lift can also help to extend the life of your boat. Here are a few reasons why:
  • Prevents Hull Damage

    Keeping your boat in the water for extended periods can lead to hull damage from debris, waves, and even marine life. With a boat lift, you can keep your boat out of the water when you’re not using it, preventing this type of damage.
  • Reduces Corrosion

    Exposure to salt water can cause corrosion on your boat’s hull, propellers, and other metal components. By lifting your boat out of the water when it’s not in use, you can reduce exposure to saltwater and prevent corrosion.
  • Avoids Fouling

    When your boat sits in the water, marine growth such as barnacles and mussels can attach to the hull and other surfaces, leading to performance issues and fuel inefficiency. A boat lift can prevent fouling by keeping your boat out of the water when not in use.
  • Protects Against Storms

    Storms and rough weather can cause significant damage to boats that are moored in the water. A boat lift provides added protection by keeping your boat out of harm’s way during severe weather.
Overall, a boat lift can help to extend the life of your boat by preventing hull damage, reducing corrosion, avoiding fouling, and providing added protection during storms. By investing in a boat lift, you can protect your investment and enjoy your boat for many years to come.

Boat Lifts Increases Property ValueAdding Value To Your Property with this dual kayak lift

In addition to saving, you time and extending the life of your boat, owning a boat lift can also increase the value of your waterfront property. Here’s how:
  • Added Convenience

    A boat lift provides added convenience for boat owners, making it easier to launch and retrieve their boats. This convenience can be a major selling point for potential buyers, especially those who are serious about boating.
  • Increased Protection

    A boat lift provides added protection for your boat, which can be a major selling point for potential buyers. Knowing that their boat will be protected from damage and marine growth can be a significant factor in their decision to purchase waterfront property.
  • Higher Resale Value

    Properties with boat lifts typically have a higher resale value than those without. This is because boat owners are willing to pay a premium for the added convenience and protection that a boat lift provides.
  • Enhanced Aesthetics

    Boat lifts can be customized to match the aesthetics of your waterfront property, adding to its overall appeal. This can be a major selling point for potential buyers who are looking for a property that is not only functional but also visually appealing.
Overall, owning a boat lift can increase the value of your waterfront property by providing added convenience, protection, and aesthetic appeal. By investing in a boat lift, you can enjoy the benefits of boating while also enhancing the value of your property.

Different Types of Boat Lifts

There are several types of boat lifts to choose from, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Here are some of the most common types of boat lifts:
  • Vertical Boat Lifts

    Vertical boat lifts are the most common type of boat lift and are designed to lift boats straight up out of the water. They are best suited for boats that are up to 10,000 pounds and have a beam width of up to 120 inches.
  • PWC Boat Lifts

    PWC jet ski lifts are designed specifically for personal watercraft such as jet skis and wave runners. They can be either vertical or cantilever and are typically smaller and more affordable than boat lifts.
  • Elevator Boat Lifts

    This type of lift raises and lowers boats vertically using a motorized elevator. Elevator boat lifts are a good option for boats that are too large or heavy for other types of lifts, or in situations where a lift needs to be installed in a narrow waterway or other constrained space.
  • Marine Railway Boat Lifts

    This type of lift uses a rail system to move boats in and out of the water. Marine railway boat lifts are typically used in areas with shallow water and are ideal for boats with flat bottoms or keels.
  • Beamless Boat Lifts

    Beamless boat lifts use a series of horizontal supports instead of traditional beams to lift and hold the boat. This design minimizes the risk of damage to the boat and allows for easier access to the boat’s hull for maintenance.
  • Trident Specialty Boat Lifts

    Trident specialty boat lifts are designed to lift boats with unusual shapes or sizes, such as pontoon boats or large sailboats.
  • Deck Boat Lifts

    Deck boat lifts are designed to lift boats that have a deck or cockpit above the hull. These lifts are ideal for boats with a higher center of gravity or that require additional clearance for the cockpit.
When choosing a boat lift, it’s important to consider the weight and size of your boat as well as your budget and personal preferences. Consulting with a professional boat lift installer can help you determine which type of lift is best suited for your needs. Overall, there are several types of boat lifts to choose from, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. By selecting the right boat lift for your boat and budget, you can enjoy the benefits of owning a boat lift while also protecting your investment.

Choosing the Right Boat Lift

When it comes to choosing a boat lift, there are several factors to consider to ensure that you select the right lift for your needs. Here are some of the most important factors to consider:
  • Boat Size

    The size and weight of your boat are the most important factors to consider when choosing a boat lift. Be sure to select a lift that is capable of safely lifting and supporting your boat’s weight.
  • Water Depth

    The depth of the water where the lift will be installed is another important factor to consider. If the water is shallow, you may need to select a lift with a smaller profile to ensure that your boat does not bottom out when entering or exiting the lift.
  • Dock Type

    The type of dock you have can also impact the type of boat lift you select. For example, if you have a floating dock, you may need to select a lift that is compatible with a floating dock.
  • Boat Type

    The type of boat you have can also impact the type of boat lift you select. For example, if you have a sailboat, you may need to select a lift with a taller profile to ensure that the mast can clear the lift.
  • Budget

    Of course, budget is always a factor when selecting a boat lift. Be sure to consider the upfront cost of the lift as well as any ongoing maintenance or repair costs when selecting a lift.
By carefully considering these factors and working with a professional boat lift installer, you can select the right boat lift for your needs and enjoy the benefits of owning a boat lift for years to come.

Final Thoughts

Owning a boat lift offers numerous benefits that can save you both time and money in the long run. By investing in a boat lift, you can enjoy the following benefits:
  • Save time by avoiding the need to constantly remove and reinstall your boat from the water.
  • Extend the life of your boat by protecting it from exposure to the elements and potential damage from waves and other watercraft.
  • Increase the value of your property by adding a valuable and convenient feature for future buyers.
When choosing a boat lift, be sure to consider important factors such as boat size, water depth, and dock type to ensure that you select the right lift for your needs and budget. Investing in a boat lift may seem like a big expense upfront, but in the long run, it can save you money and hassle by protecting your boat and simplifying your boating experience. Don’t hesitate to consult with a professional boat lift installer to help you choose the right lift for your needs. We encourage you to consider the benefits of owning a boat lift and make the investment today. Your boat and your wallet will thank you for it. Request a custom boat lift quote right away!

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Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) on Owning a Boat & How This Investment Can Save You Time And Money

Boat lifts offer several key benefits, including protecting your boat from water-related damage, reducing maintenance costs, and extending the life of your boat’s hull by keeping it out of the water when not in use.

By using a boat lift, you can decrease the frequency and severity of maintenance required for your boat. This includes less frequent hull cleaning, reduced need for anti-fouling paints, and protection against corrosion and weather-related wear, all of which can significantly reduce maintenance costs over time.

Yes, boat lifts allow for immediate access to the water without the time-consuming process of docking and undocking at a marina. They also minimize the time spent on cleaning and maintenance, as the boat is less exposed to the elements and aquatic organisms that can attach to the hull.

Boat lifts come in various designs and capacities to accommodate different types of watercraft, from small fishing boats to large yachts. Many models can be customized to the specific size and weight of your boat, ensuring proper handling and safety.

Even for those who boat infrequently, a boat lift can be a worthwhile investment. It protects the boat from long-term damage from water stagnation and environmental exposure, potentially increasing the boat’s resale value and reducing the need for costly repairs caused by prolonged docking.